The Royal Welsh Show in July is the biggest agricultural show in Europe. It is organised by the Royal Welsh Agricultural Society, and takes place in July of each year, at Llanelwedd, near Builth Wells in mid-Wales. The show lasts for four days and attracts more than 200,000 visitors annually, making it one of Wales's major tourist attractions. Events include: * Judging of cattle, sheep, horses, goats and various other domestic animals * Sheep dog trials * Sheep shearing competitions * Riding competitions * Driving displays * Falconry * Games and sports * Craft show * Live music Given its "Royal" status it is not unusual for a senior member of the Royal family to attend at the Show. A familiar sight is HRH the Prince of Wales who is acknowledged to be a keen supporter of the farming community. Indeed following his outspoken support during the 2001 foot and mouth crisis, many farmers regard him as an influential figure. One farming union, the FUW, nominated him for his outstanding contribution to agriculture in 2003 which was announced at the show.

This magnificent eleventh century cathedral is most often visited for its beautiful choir vaulting and stained glass windows depicting Welsh saints. It houses the largest Norman font in Britain and the regimental chapel of the South Wales Borderers, who won renown in the Zulu War (shown in the movie Zulu). The cathedral also contains a rare Breeches Bible. The l6th Century tithe barn is now a Heritage Centre and craft shop. There is also an excellent restaurant in the cathedral grounds. There is an outstanding programme of weekend music recitals.

We invite you to enjoy the company of some of the most skilled, passionate and articulate food-lovers in the country. Feast the senses with wonderful produce by artisan food-makers from Wales, The Marches and further afield. Special events will include masterclasses, tutored tastings, children's events, walks and talks.

The Hay Festival of Literature & Arts is an annual literature festival held in Hay-on-Wye, Wales for ten days from May to June. Devised by Peter Florence in 1988, the festival was described by Bill Clinton in 2001 as "The Woodstock of the mind".[1] Since its inception, the festival was held at a variety of venues around Hay until 2005 when it moved to a central location just outside of the town.[2] The Guardian has been the main sponsor of the festival since 2002, succeeding The Sunday Times.